How To Convert Social Media Fans Into Foot Traffic

by Lauren Fernandez on Sep 05, 2013

Len Kendall tweeted a few weeks ago that…

 

Stop and think about it.

Your social content across the board should be treated as a type of ad.

Witty content with a photo of product? You want it to cause an action.

Promotion that you want to have a WOM domino effect? You are indirectly advertising to them.

Manipulation through data is key to get people into the stores.

Amplify, not replace.

But how do you get there?

At Morton’s, and our parent company, Landry’s, we start with customer behavior.

Customer behavior can be broken into two segments: your current customer, and those you want to have as customers. In the middle, there are the customers that want to be the regular customer, as they are striving to be at a certain level.

Consumer behavior is the foundation and basis for converting online content to foot traffic in-store: all while tracking the process.

1. Identify Key Trends

analytics

Each week, set aside time to evaluate your data – whether it is on Facebook, Twitter, bounce-back to your website, or something else. Humans are habit-forming, and tend to form routines.

You will start to see patterns in behavior, from the time that a consumer posts, to the type of posts that resonate the best. It’s not enough to look for certain topics, but certain words, and even how you structure them, is going to impact how a consumer reacts to the content.

Remember, you want to focus on what the consumer will do after reading the content. What type of action do you want them to take? And how can you track it?

2. Uncover Drivers

customer motivation

The action that a consumer takes is called a “driver.” What will drive the consumer to your store? Is it the type of content? Is it the type of promotion? What segment and layer of consumer are you hitting?

The key to getting butts in seats is understanding what a consumer will do to get to your location, and what they will do once inside. This is why it’s imperative to understand the various layers of your consumer.

An example of this:

Through data analyzation, at Morton’s we know that a secondary demographic is the “special occasion diners” – those that strive to regularly eat at a high-end place, but can only afford to do so on special occasions. You put in the unique URL so you can track clicks, and put in the redeem code to track how many come in store.

Molly is one of those special occasion customers. She has an anniversary coming up with her husband of 10 years.

As a milestone anniversary, they want to make it special, but want to save a little on the final bill. She notices that her husband’s favorite steakhouse is offering a free dessert with purchase of an entrée.

By understanding consumer behavior, you know that most who go in to dine are hungry, and will eat the bigger entrees before getting the free dessert, making their average check price much higher than if the free item was at the start of the meal.

The metrics that serve as the foundation is how many of the free dessert are redeemed. Even if it seems like a small number, don’t stop there. Look past the free part and see how much was spent during the night. The cost you cover is far less than the money made.

How Does The Content Interplay with Foot Traffic?

restaurant bill

The C-Suite should always ask what the ROI is from posting on social media. This is the fun part – measuring the consumer action based off of their behavior.

Presentation of success should be similar to the below:

  • What It Was: What was the offer or clickable action? How many clicks did you receive from the social content alone?
  • What They Did: What did the consumer do once in store? How many redeems were received, and how does that vary from the # of clicks?
  • Looking Past the Click: What did the consumer do in addition to the offer? Did they spend outside of the offer?

Consumer behavior, analytics and amplifying content to get foot traffic is all about telling a story and relating to people through their habitual behavior.

Tell me, what’s your story?

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Post Author

Digital at Landrys Inc. Fan of the Packers....

  • http://about.me/jenniferlmacdonald Jennifer MacDonald

    Lauren great article. I have tried to convey this message to my clients but they say that they don’t care, they are only interested in likes or RTs. Any advice for making them see the bigger picture?

  • LacyMB

    This is a great article – and a topic that doesn’t get nearly enough coverage!

  • laurenfernandez

    I would say to not shy away from RTs and Likes…. but build on it. Our C-Suite is always interested in qualitative metrics, so we always include them.

    I show them that it is the foundation of our results, but that we need to be able to look past it to show more of the bottom line. Education is key – once they understood superficial metrics vs. ones we needed, I was able to do a lot more.

  • laurenfernandez

    Thanks, Lacy! I appreciate the kudos.

  • http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/8591?return=%2Fideas%2Findex%2F10%2Fcompany%3Agolinharris Len Kendall

    Awesome post and thank you kindly for the mention. Time and time again I’ve seen brands start with channels and metrics, and not with content. Anyone can do the former, but standing out amongst the sea of other brands and individuals in social requires original and empathetic content.

    (This is much easier when you’re in the business of selling steaks…so lucky you)

  • laurenfernandez

    You got the brain rolling on what I ended up talking about, so THANK YOU for that, my friend.

    It’s true – Morton’s is very lucky in that we can push some dynamic food. And, you’re right… so many start with the channels and metrics and don’t think of the base. Hard to go from the top down.

  • http://www.worob.com/ Worob

    Nice article :)

  • laurenfernandez

    Thanks!

  • https://corp.wishpond.com/ Nick @ Wishpond

    For our brick-and-mortar clients we see great results when they blend their social contests and promotions with their store. This makes the location itself interactive and social – and drives a lot of people there for the chance to win a prize.

    Our client, The Burrard, ran a Twitter photo contest in which they asked people to enter a photo of a hidden character in their bar to win.

  • laurenfernandez

    I think that’s a steep slope. It puts a lot of responsibility on staff, servers, etc to execute and be on top of your campaign. Busy happens, mistakes can happen and its really hard to keep track if you don’t have a handle on it from the corporate side.

    We do many tie-ins, but try to make it as easy as possible for our in-store staff, and focus more on the customer action.

  • https://corp.wishpond.com/ Nick @ Wishpond

    I understand the concern – I wouldn’t recommend this if the staff actually had to handle the contests manually.

    Our Twitter photo contest app handles all of the entry, tracking and information dispensing – all a person needs to do is take a photo and enter using the app’s entry form on their mobile phone.

  • http://about.me/jenniferlmacdonald Jennifer MacDonald

    Thanks, I’ve been telling my team that we need more case studies that illustrate those points!

  • laurenfernandez

    Maybe I’m confused, then, as to why you said you make the actual location interactive. At some level, staff needs to be aware of the contest, how it works, and what it will accomplish.

    Apps are great, but there is also education for the customer AND staff. Staff will need to answer questions if the customer doesnt understand the app, or the form. It’s a big hurdle that many faced when QR codes were big.

  • https://corp.wishpond.com/ Nick @ Wishpond

    When I say “make the location interactive” I mean having the entry method of the contest include something in the store – such as taking a photo of yourself at a location or answering a trivia question that on the menu.

    There is a learning gap for staff and customers, yes. But we’ve been able to create optimized boiler plate instructions that make it easy to display on tent cards and in-store signage – after running a few of them and understanding the road blocks.

    Most of our clients are small businesses ownes who don’t have a ton of social media or tech experience, so we’ve been forced to make it easy for them (and the users) to work the app.

  • Guest

    Whatever happened to the days of gaining mass customers by catalog magazine? most went online in order to survive, a lot of social networks and blogs fail all to often
    the result can be rewarding if you strike it rich with lots of traffic,
    in today’s world one million hits a month world most likely will not
    generate enough revenue to even buy a cup of Lata. Few blogs and social sites that are aimed to make money have survived over the years, one that comes to mind is Yapmouth such a site like this needs to produce and place products created by the network/site in order to have repeat visitors and drive up
    all around traffic. The one thing I notice about Walmart online and
    offline is there ability to flex with prices, The front store set up is a
    similar idea to online speed traps once you go in its hard to come back
    out!

  • John Vester

    Whatever happened to the days of gaining mass customers by catalog magazine? most went online in order to survive, a lot of social networks and blogs fail all to often the result can be rewarding if you strike it rich with lots of traffic, in today’s world one million hits a month world most likely will not generate enough revenue to even buy a cup of Lata. Few blogs and social sites that are aimed to make money have survived over the years, one that comes to mind is YAPMOUTH such a site like this needs to produce and place products created by the network/site in order to have repeat visitors and drive up all around traffic. The one thing I notice about Walmart online and offline is there ability to flex with prices, The front store set up is a similar idea to online speed traps once you go in its hard to come back out!

  • http://www.agencyplatform.com/ Dave Thompson

    Social Media is like a game and the one who plays well wins. The better the strategy the better the results. And content plays a key role in the strategy. Great Ideas also make a huge difference, if the idea is something unusual and liked by people it automatically drives traffic.